LOST’s First & Last Scenes…At the Same Time

Don’t watch if you don’t want to cry! That music gets me every time…

EW: Ausiello’s Dream Emmy Noms #2

Best Supporting Actor (I’m posting only the LOST ones):

Nestor Carbonell (Lost): Arguably the high point of the final season was “Ab Aeterno” and Carbonell’s career-defining work in it.
aired.

Terry O’Quinn (Lost): His Man in Black/Smoke Monster was the first villain on the show to surpass creepy and get downright scary.
matter.

http://ausiellofiles.ew.com/2010/05/26/dream-emmy-supporting-drama/

‘LOST’ No More

‘LOST’ No More

As his hit series comes to an end, Matthew Fox looks to the future.

Somewhere, in a parallel universe, Matthew Fox is working on Wall Street. That was his original plan when he attended Columbia University, where he earned a degree economics. But through a combination of chance, perseverance, and fate, he ended up the star of the ABC phenomenon “ Lost.” Over six seasons, his beleaguered Dr. Jack Shephard has roamed past, future, sideways worlds to take on a smoke monster, uncontrollable time travel, and the literal and figurative ghosts of his father. Audiences have watched as Jack has gone from a man science and reluctant leader to a man of faith ready to embrace his destiny. Just what that destiny is will finally be revealed May 23 in the show’s hotly anticipated two-and-a-half-hour series finale.

As Jack’s story has unfolded, Fox has transformed. Previously best known as the eldest sibling on the soapy drama “ Party of Five,” the actor made a conscious decision to pursue different types of roles when that show ended in 2000. His complex, assured work on Lost” led to in films like “ Speed Racer” and “ We Are Marshall,” and he plans continue choosing roles that pair him with filmmakers he respects admires.

But where does one go after six years on a genre-defying, groundbreaking series? In Fox’s case, the answer is Oregon. After living on the Hawaiian island of Oahu “ Lost” is filmed, Fox is moving his family to Pacific Northwest where he can be closer to family and friends and kind of country that I love: mountains and big, big horizons.” He doesn’t worry about missing out being so far from Hollywood; he plans to commute regularly to L. A. to pursue the projects he’s passionate about.

Read more…

The End: Untangled

Finale Footage of Crash Images Confuse Viewers

Finale Footage of Crash Images Confuse Viewers

You know those Oceanic 815 plane crash images that ran after Jack’s (Matthew Fox) eye closed and the “Lost” logo appeared on our TV screens? Some “Lost” fans and TV critics have wondered if they were a last Easter egg from the producers, a clue meant to lead us to conclude that no one survived Oceanic 815′s crash landing — and therefore everything we’ve seen over the last six years never really happened.

Well, ABC wants to clear the air: Those photographs were not part of the “Lost” story at all. The network added them to soften the transition from the moving ending of the series to the 11 p.m. news and never considered that it would confuse viewers about the actual ending of the show.

“The images shown during the end credits of the ‘Lost’ finale, which included shots of Oceanic 815 on a deserted beach, were not part of the final story but were a visual aid to allow the viewer to decompress before heading into the news,” an ABC spokesperson wrote in an e-mail Tuesday.

That means, Losties, that we were not supposed to think that Christian Shepherd (John Terry) is a liar. What Christian told his son, when they were reunited at the church, should serve as guidance for our interpretation of the series’ ending.

So let’s review: Christian told Jack that he was dead and everyone else in the church was too — some had died before Jack, as we already knew, and some died long after. The sideways flashes then were a step in everyone’s after-lives, a way to reconnect before moving on permanently. While there still may be unanswered questions related to that religious and spiritual conclusion to the “Lost” story, the photographs were really just a nostalgic, transitional touch added by ABC executives — and not executive producers Damon Lindelof and Carlton Cuse.

Love or hate it, that’s the final answer.

Source: http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/

Page 5 of 99« First...34567...102030...Last »